Oleg Valentins Novosëlov, Expatriate, Pensioner (novoslov) wrote,
Oleg Valentins Novosëlov, Expatriate, Pensioner
novoslov

сеансы связи

один профессор Стендфордского Университета любил проводить семинары гуляя в долине где и наткнулся на природные минералы кварца разбросанными камушками различной величины по всей долине.
Студент стал экспериментировать в лаборатории и нашёл замечательные свойства минерала
Эти камушки генерировали волны заданной частоты в радиопередатчиках точно, что позволяло американцам совершать сеансы связи более успешно в отличии от противника национал социалистов которые пользовались станциями без кварцевого генератора частот от того связь была неустойчивая и они не могли уверенно и быстро поменять частоту чтобы их не прослушивали.

The Radio War
Quartz Crystal for Radio Control
Military Communications
"Silicon Valley's secret recipe"
The U. S. Army Signal. Corps.
depend upon the use of quartz crystals in all applications where accurate frequency
Prior to World War If, the Signal Corps accepted the use of qvartz.
Frederick Emmons Terman
the universal resonance curve, a concept introduced by Frederick E. Terman
Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard were two of Terman’s favorite engineering students
The positive influence Fred Terman had in the world is shown by the history portrayed here of the Hewlett-Packard Company.
http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/earlyinstruments/0007/
He hated it but learned “management by walking around” when he worked on the shop production floor to lower defects in mercury vapor rectifiers. Terman guided Hewlett to get a graduate degree and pursue studies in resistance capacity oscillators (which would be HP‘s first product). Hewlett spent some time in MIT to get his degree, then returned home to a job Terman found him building oscillators.
Hewlett stayed on for a year of graduate study with Professor Frederick Terman before leaving for MIT, where he received a master's degree. He returned to Stanford in 1936 to work on a degree in electrical engineering.
Terman began to encourage some of his promising students to start companies near the university. When the "resistance-tuned oscillator" was discovered, Terman thought it had great commercial possibilities, and he told Hewlett that it looked like it could be used to make an instrument that would be a lot simpler and cheaper than anything on the market. However, there were some stability problems that had to be solved to make it functional. Hewlett devised an innovative solution; he designed and built an audio oscillator, a device that generates signals of varying frequencies which took advantage of the nonlinear resistance-temperature characteristic of a small light bulb to remove a serious instability. The addition of one inexpensive component turned a balky laboratory curiosity into a reliable, marketable instrument.

the Bell Telephone Laboratories & Brush Development Company
Echelon global surveillance
Prism
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